Other Grandeur Travelers.

Saturday, June 2, 2012

The Mind Museum: A Playground for the Curious Mind


Yes, that's Jollibee!


Kids are fortunate to have technology at their fingertips these days. Information can virtually be accessed anywhere, making learning an easier process for young ones. Now, they should consider themselves even luckier with the recent opening of the Mind Museum in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig. 

Last year, I remember seeing this spaceship-like structure being built when was I studying for my board exam in Burgos Circle. The Mind Museum at Taguig (TMMT) seemed like THE project the Fort needed to make it a true world-class global city. The idea of having a modern museum in the most progressive (and not to mention cleanest and most organized) city of Metro Manila was promising. 

When it finally opened last March, I was perhaps one of the people that eagerly wanted to see it but I was out of the country. I felt the need to answer question some of you had: What can you expect from the Mind Museum? A few days ago, I was happy to cross the museum out of my list when I made time to visit it with my younger siblings. Here's what I think.

With certainty, I can tell you that the Mind Museum is specifically designed for kids.  However, it does not mean there isn't anything in the museum that adults can enjoy. There are more than 250 interactive and engaging exhibits waiting to be explored by any curious mind. The exhibitions are presented through five main galleries: Atom, Life, Earth, Universe, and Technology

At the entrance, everyone is greeted by Aedi, an adorable robot that orients you before exploring the Mind Museum. Surprisingly, the museum isn't as big as it looks from the outside. I wonder if there are parts of the Museum I haven't seen (or are they planning to add more galleries later?)

Here to assist you are the Mind Movers or museum guides. They are the segway-riding individuals who have been trained to explain science concepts to anyone who wants to end his or her confusion.

The first exhibition we visited was the Universe Gallery. This is basically the museum's Planetarium where you can star-gaze even during daytime. There has always been something beautiful about stars, even fake ones.

The dome-shaped structure is the SPACESHELL that features films about space, comets, and other heavenly bodies. Inside, They have memory foams that will make viewing more pleasurable. It became too comfortable that I was literally with the stars in my dream already. You need to be here at least 30 minutes before the show starts. We saw a film depicting the possible collision of a comet with earth.  

If you don't know the difference between quarter moon or full moon (Gasp!), there are buttons here that you can press to show you each Lunar Phase.

Check out how Robots traverse the rough terrain of Mars.

It might not be a good idea to walk the entire stretch of this revolving tunnel if you suffer from vertigo. 

Replica of a Spacesuit.



Earth Gallery - It features Stan, the First Tyrannosaurus Rex (T-Rex) exhibition of the Philippines. For those who haven't had the opportunity to visit the American Museum of Natural History in New York, this would be a delightful sight. Any kid would love to see these fossilized creatures in real life.


Aside from that, this gallery also showcases natural history starting 4.6 billion years ago. Learn about volcanoes, tectonic plates and the evolution of earthquakes. 

When you go up the second floor, you will find the biggest exhibition in the museum: the Technology Gallery. It overlooks all the other four galleries.

This takes scientific literacy to a whole new level. It would be a great supplement for all the science classes that kids are taking. It is divided into 5 sections: How we Live, Who We Are, How We Know, How Things Work, and Here to There. The whole area shows how technology was created based on man's needs.

The centerpiece: The Human Face of Technology, a 360 degree screen featuring stories by individuals about their favorite technologies/gadgets.

Practical inventions are showcased too. A word of Caution: Watch your kids. They might do number 2 here. 

*Sniff* Exploring some popular scents. My favorite was the Lavender.

Why cars have round wheels. Go figure,

A harp without strings. Try playing it and you'll be surprised.

Oh yes, They even have an arcade here. I did bother to ask why.
You'll even find an x-ray machine seen at the airport. For someone who travels a lot, seeing and doing the process myself was a treat. Care to guess what was inside my bag?

If you want to learn how to say some basic phrases in other languages, you only need to twist this.

The Story of Life Gallery : Features the human brain. It showcases living organisms in the planet, from the microscopic to the biggest ones.


If you want to know how your most favorite or most hated critter looks like, you can view them here. After doing that, I have found a renewed disgust/aversion for these creatures. 

ATOM GALLERY - Engineering majors or engineers may find this uninteresting but for the rest of us, you will have fun here. This was the gallery that I probably enjoyed the most. Here you will be able to understand basic elemental forces such as gravity, electromagnetism and forces.
How particles move in different decibels.

In the Shadow box, your shadows will be projected onto this green wall after being hit by a light. Ill try a different pose next time.

Everyone's favorite is the static ball. It will illustrate how electrostatic energy could give you a bad hair day. Mine was not too pronounced because of hair wax.

It was more obvious with Val.

Another interesting part of the Museum is this spine-like tunnel designed by Ed Calma. An engaging exhibition of light, waves, ripples, etc inside.


Without a doubt, TMMT is a unique educational institution made with the kids in mind. Not adults. You might be disappointed thinking otherwise. Nonetheless, with an open mind, anyone can have fun learning about the life, the universe, technology, atoms, and the earth. However, I hope they will have more unique installations and exhibitions in the future. Doing that will further establish this as the museum that will aid not only in the continuing education of the Filipino people, but it will likewise serve a venue for us to show local art and talent. Its potential is limitless.


For tickets, online reservation is recommended. Visit www.themindmuseum.org. 

Ticket Prices: Adults P600. Students (Private) P450, Teachers and Public Schools: P150. Tel No. 909-MIND (6463) Notes: The museum can only allow 600 people at a given time (3 hours max for regular tickets but they also have day passes) Sched: 9-12, 12-3, 3-6. During weekends, they have later closing hours.

Other things to do:

Interactive playground in the museum grounds for kids.

Eat at the Museum Cafeteria on the second floor. Sometimes, you can also attend some discussions or forums here. Check the Museum site for the updates and schedule.

10 comments:

Mil said...

Hi Deo! This looks like a place where kids would really enjoy. Thanks for Sharing!

darwin said...

Oh so you've already visited the museum. sayang we werent able to meet. When did you visit?

thanks

deobaraanmd said...

hi darwin! yes I already went there last week. yeah sayang i wasnt able to meet you.

deobaraanmd said...

@welcome mil. :)

Kenn Pumares said...

Wow! Good to know, you're back. I've been stalking your posts for couple of months now for I find it inspiring.

My lil bro will love to visit this Museum. ThanKs for sharing...

deobaraanmd said...

Hi Ken! thanks so much. Yes, I've been back for a while but I am leaving soon again this month. Trying to explore more of the Philippines as much as I can.

Anyway, I am sure your little brother will love the museum. It's wonderful for kids! Cheers!

Mc Pol Androuse Cruz said...

I'll visit this place:) thank you for the information.

deobaraanmd said...

Sure Mc! welcome!

cheesecake said...

we would definitely try this out sometime. thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

hi GT! just wanna ask, is a 3-hour pass enough to see all the galleries or do you recommend an all-day pass?